Peace Operations Seen from Below: UN Missions and Local People

IPI was pleased to launch a new book on UN peacekeeping entitled, Peace Operations Seen from Below: UN Missions and Local People by Dr. Beatrice Pouligny.
Cambodia, Somalia, Mozambique, El Salvador, Bosnia, Haiti, Sierra Leone: all have been the subject of UN peacekeeping interventions designed to stabilize societies torn by armed conflict. Yet, there is surprisingly little research on how local communities interact with and respond to peacekeepers in their midst. Drawing on extensive field research and first-hand observation, Dr. Pouligny investigates how local populations interact with UN blue helmets and civilian personnel. She argues that much of what is at stake in societies emerging from war lies in the “ordinary” lives of local populations, which are deeply affected by interactions with UN peacekeepers. This impressive new study sheds light on a neglected but crucial dimension of international peace operations.

Our distinguished panel included Beatrice Pouligny, Senior Research Fellow at the French Centre for International Studies and Research(CERI — Sciences Po) and Visiting Professor at Georgetown University School of Foreign Service, Michele Brandt, Director, Interpeace, and Dirk Salomons, Director, Humanitarian Affairs Program, School of International and Public Affairs Columbia University Office.

John L. Hirsch, Adjunct Professor, School of International and Public Affairs, Columbia University and Former United States Ambassador to the Republic of Sierra Leone served as the Chair.