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Policy Papers - September 19, 2014

New Report Calls for Integrated Multilateral Response to Organized Crime

Walter Kemp and Mark Shaw

Since the end of the Cold War, organized crime has moved from being a marginal problem in a few cities and regions to being a mainstream threat to national stability and international peace and security. While the threat has become transnational, the multilateral response has been slow, disjointed, and reactive.  

 

Policy Papers - June 03, 2013

The Elephant in the Room: How Can Peace Operations Deal with Organized Crime?

Walter Kemp, Mark Shaw, and Arthur Boutellis

From Afghanistan to Kosovo, from Mali to Somalia, organized crime threatens peace and security. And yet, of the current 28 UN peacekeeping, peacebuilding or special political missions, less than half have mandates related to organized crime, and those that do are not well-equipped or well-prepared to face this threat.  

 

Books - February 14, 2012

Termites at Work: Transnational Organized Crime and State Erosion in Kenya—Comprehensive Research Findings

The threat posed by organized crime is not confined to serious crimes such as racketeering, the global drug trade, or human trafficking. For many developing countries and fragile states, powerful transnational criminal networks constitute a direct threat to the state itself, not through open confrontation but by penetrating state institutions through bribery and corruption and by subverting or undermining them from within. This paper examines whether Kenya faces such a threat.  

 

Policy Papers - October 28, 2011

Know Your Enemy: An Overview of Organized Crime Threat Assessments

Mark Shaw

There is increasing awareness within police forces and international organizations that organized crime is a growing threat to security. However, due to a lack of data and insufficient knowledge about illicit activities, criminal justice experts are often left chasing shadows.  

 

Books - October 12, 2011

Peace Operations and Organized Crime: Enemies or Allies?

James Cockayne and Adam Lupel, editors

Peace operations are increasingly on the front line in the international community’s fight against organized crime. This book explores how, in some cases, peace operations and organized crime are clear enemies, while in others, they may become tacit allies.