IPI HomeEventsPanel DiscussionsUN Security Council Strategies for Managing Civil Wars Evolving

 

print print  |  share share back back

Panel Discussions - Tuesday, September 14, 2010

UN Security Council Strategies for Managing Civil Wars Evolving

A policy discussion around a new IPI report on UN Security Council strategies for managing civil wars included comments by Ambassador Gert Rosenthal of Guatemala, who called the report "fascinating" and said that "it shows a Security Council which is continually evolving."

The report's findings were presented at the September 14th event by Christoph Mikulaschek, IPI Senior Policy Analyst. Mr. Mikulaschek’s analysis summarized the report, which presents insights from a new dataset compiled at IPI. The report and the discussions at the policy forum illustrate that the UN Security Council has been moving from a stance of nonengagement with civil wars to one of systematic engagement with internal armed conflict over the past twenty years.

The report is the first publication produced by IPI’s multiyear research project on compliance with UN Security Council resolutions in civil wars, and shows that, though the Security Council has transformed its repertoire of civil-war response strategies, the evolution in the Security Council’s practice did not develop evenly over time. The Council’s engagement in conflict management also greatly varied between different civil-war situations.

Referring to climate change and organized crime as new drivers of armed conflict, Ambassador Rosenthal said that “the considerable evolution in the way the Security Council engages with conflict will continue to change in the future, perhaps radically.”

Professor Michael W. Doyle, Harold Brown Professor of International Affairs, Law, and Political Science at Columbia University, offered a wide-ranging analysis of the Security Council’s mixed record in managing contemporary civil wars. He noted that “we see, on the positive side, a great deal of institutional growth that is, in some respects, surprising, and on the negative side, we see problems with effectiveness.”

The event was chaired by Dr. Edward C. Luck, IPI Senior Vice President for Research and Programs, and attracted a diverse audience of more than one-hundred diplomats, scholars, and representatives of the UN Secretariat.

 Read report

See Mr. Mikulaschek's presentation (.ppt)

 Read event transcript

The Global Observatory

Caught in the Middle: Civilian Protection in South Sudan
Absent an active effort by the South Sudanese government, the UN Mission will need to adopt a holistic approach to civilian protection.

Key Global Events to Watch in October
A list of key upcoming meetings and events with implications for global affairs.

2014 Top 10 Issues to Watch in Peace & Security: The Global Arena
A list of ten key issues to watch that are likely to impact international peace and security in 2014, compiled by IPI's Francesco Mancini.

The Global Observatory, produced by IPI, provides timely analysis on peace and security issues, interviews with leading policymakers, interactive maps, and more.

Recent Events

October 09, 2014
Rethinking Women and Forced Migration
The drastic increase in conflicts around the globe has seen the world’s displaced population pass 55 million people, and the fact that 80% of them are women and children is prompting many to rethink how the international community is responding.

October 09, 2014
Africa: China’s Second Continent
Speaking at an IPI Distinguished Author Series event on October 9th, author Howard French made a case for how Western underestimation of Africa’s economic promise has enabled China to establish an economic and human presence on the continent, leading to the permanent migration there of nearly 2 million Chinese.

September 30, 2014
Vike-Freiberga: Rethinking the United Nations
In a speech delivered at IPI on September 30th, Dr. Vaira Vike-Freiberga gave a sobering historical analysis of the gains and setbacks made by the international system over the past century and, focusing on the UN, she called for a rethinking of the organization’s structure and approach to peace.

View More