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Panel Discussions - Thursday, July 12, 2007

Greater than the Sum of Its Parts? Assessing "Whole of Government" Approaches to Fragile States

The International Peace Institute launched its most recent book, Greater than the Sum of Its Parts? Assessing "Whole of Government" Approaches to Fragile States, by Stewart Patrick and Kaysie Brown.
Fragile states represent both the hard core of today's global development challenge and a growing source of threats to international security. As such, integrated approaches are needed to promote security, good governance and recovery in weak, failing and war-torn countries. Responding to this challenge, many donors are adopting "whole of government" strategies that bring together their diplomatic, defense, and development instruments--the so-called "3Ds."

Greater than the Sum of Its Parts? examines how these trends are playing out in seven leading donor countries: the United Kingdom, United States, Canada, Australia, Germany, France, and Sweden. The book candidly addresses the shortcomings in recent efforts to achieve "joined up" responses and underscores the tensions inherent in efforts to reconcile the priorities and time frames of foreign, defense, and development ministries.

Our panelists included Dr. Stewart Patrick, Research Fellow, Center for Global Development and Ms. Kaysie Brown, Program Associate, Center for Global Development. Our discussants included H.E. Ms. Karen Pierce, Ambassador and Deputy Permanent Representative of the United Kingdom to the United Nations and Ms. Nicole Ball, Senior Fellow, Center for International Policy.

This meeting was chaired by Dr. Elizabeth Cousens.

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