IPI HomePublicationsPolicy PapersTrends in Uniformed Contributions to UN Peacekeeping: A New Dataset, 1991–2012

 

print print  |  share share back back

Policy Papers - June 13, 2013

Trends in Uniformed Contributions to UN Peacekeeping: A New Dataset, 1991–2012

Chris Perry and Adam Smith

 

 

Despite the tremendous and continuing efforts associated with UN peacekeeping operations, the full range of available data on uniformed contributions to UN peacekeeping has not been readily available to researchers, limiting the use of quantitative methods on questions related to UN peacekeeping. The new IPI Peacekeeping Database, developed by the International Peace Institute, fills this gap.

Drawing from UN archival records, the database presents the first publicly available database of total uniformed personnel contributions of each contributing country by month, by type (troop, police, or expert/observer) and by mission, from November 1990 to the present.

You can find the database files for download here.

This report introduces the database, identifies key trends in contributions to UN peacekeeping over the past two decades, and suggests opportunities for further research using this online dataset.

Presenting their initial findings from the data, the authors explore regional and subregional trends and countries’ contribution rationales, such as whether aspiration for a permanent Security Council seat influences patterns of contributions. They also demonstrate both a broadening and narrowing of the “base” of troop- and police-contributing countries.

This is the third paper in IPI’s Providing for Peacekeeping series, which is coordinated in partnership with Griffith University and the Elliott School of International Affairs at George Washington University. The first report was "Broadening the Base of United Nations Troop-and Police-Contributing Countries" and the second was “Rethinking Force Generation: Filling Capability Gaps in UN Peacekeeping.”

About the authors:
Chris Perry is a Senior Policy Analyst at the International Peace Institute.
Adam Smith
is a Research Fellow and Manager of the Peace Operations Program at the International Peace Institute.

The Global Observatory

Killing of al-Shabaab Leader Throws Future of Militant Group into Question
In the short term, the killing of Godane is likely to result in more violent attacks, but longer-term consequences are hard to predict.

Key Global Events to Watch in September
A list of key upcoming meetings and events with implications for global affairs.

2014 Top 10 Issues to Watch in Peace & Security: The Global Arena
A list of ten key issues to watch that are likely to impact international peace and security in 2014, compiled by IPI's Francesco Mancini.

The Global Observatory, produced by IPI, provides timely analysis on peace and security issues, interviews with leading policymakers, interactive maps, and more.

Recent Events

September 19, 2014
Madani: Extremist Group Actions “Cannot be Associated with Any Religion”
Iyad Madani, the Secretary-General of the Organisation of Islamic Cooperation (OIC), reaffirmed at IPI the Muslim world’s commitment to religious tolerance and human rights and sought to distance Islam from the recent violent actions at the hands of extremist groups across Africa and the Middle East.

September 15, 2014
Despite Disaffection, Youth Still Engaged with Democracy
Young people around the world appear increasingly disaffected with politics and political institutions, particularly in countries where corruption is rampant and government accountability is lacking. Yet during a September 15th event commemorating the International Day of Democracy, a group of young political activists from three different continents spoke at IPI

September 10, 2014
Lessons from the Past, Visions for the Future: The Middle East After 1914
On September 10-11, 2014, the International Peace Institute launched its inaugural meeting at its Middle East Regional Office in Manama, Bahrain titled “Lessons from the Past, Visions for the Future: The Middle East After 1914.”

View More